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12 Bad Companion Plants for Basil You Should Avoid

12 Bad Companion Plants for Basil You Should Avoid

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As a gardening enthusiast, it’s important to know that not all plants play nice together in the garden.

When it comes to basil, some plants can hinder its growth or attract pests that cause more harm than good.

In this article, we’ll explore 12 bad companion plants for basil that you should avoid to ensure a healthy and thriving basil harvest.

1. Cucumbers

Cucumbers may seem like a harmless garden vegetable, but they can cause problems when planted near basil.

Cucumbers are susceptible to several pests that can also target basil, such as aphids and whiteflies.

By planting cucumbers near basil, you might inadvertently attract more pests to your garden.

Additionally, cucumbers have high water requirements, which could cause overwatering issues for your basil plants.

Keep cucumbers away from your basil plants to avoid potential pest issues and maintain a balanced garden environment.

2. Cabbage

Cabbage, while a garden staple, can be a poor companion for basil.

Cabbage attracts pests like cabbage worms and cabbage loopers, which can spread and cause problems for your basil plants.

Cabbage also has different nutrient requirements, which could lead to competition between the plants, hindering basil’s growth.

It’s best to keep cabbage and basil in separate areas of your garden to prevent pest problems from escalating and ensure each plant gets the nutrients it needs.

3. Cauliflower

Cauliflower, like cabbage, can also be a bad neighbor for basil.

This vegetable attracts similar pests, such as cabbage worms and cabbage loopers, which can then target your basil plants.

Additionally, cauliflower has a large root system that can compete with basil for water and nutrients in the soil.

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It’s best to maintain some distance between your basil and cauliflower plants to minimize the risk of pest infestations and competition for resources.

4. Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are another cruciferous vegetable that can cause issues when planted near basil.

They attract pests like cabbage worms and cabbage loopers, which can spread to your basil plants and cause damage.

Furthermore, Brussels sprouts can compete with basil for valuable nutrients in the soil, leading to slower growth and weaker plants.

To protect your basil from potential harm, it’s best to plant Brussels sprouts in a separate area of your garden.

5. Broccoli

Broccoli, another member of the cruciferous family, can also be a poor companion for basil.

It attracts pests like cabbage worms, cabbage loopers, and aphids, which can easily move from broccoli plants to your basil.

Moreover, broccoli has a large root system and nutrient requirements that can compete with your basil plants.

It’s a good idea to keep broccoli and basil apart in your garden to avoid any negative effects on your basil plants.

6. Kale

Kale, a leafy green vegetable, can cause issues when planted near basil.

Similar to other cruciferous vegetables, kale can attract pests like cabbage worms and aphids that may target your basil plants.

Kale also has different nutrient and water requirements than basil, potentially leading to competition for resources.

To keep your basil plants healthy and pest-free, it’s best to grow kale in a separate area of your garden.

7. Sweet Corn

Sweet corn might not be the first plant you think of as a bad companion for basil, but it can cause issues.

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Corn can attract pests like earworms and cutworms, which may spread to your basil plants.

In addition, corn is a heavy feeder, which means it can compete with basil for nutrients in the soil, resulting in weaker basil plants.

Keep sweet corn away from your basil plants to prevent any potential problems.

8. Potatoes

Potatoes, while a popular garden vegetable, can be a poor companion for basil.

Potatoes can attract pests like potato beetles, which can also target your basil plants.

Additionally, potatoes and basil have different watering needs, with potatoes requiring more consistent moisture than basil, which prefers slightly drier soil.

This difference in water requirements can lead to either overwatering or underwatering, depending on the needs of each plant.

To avoid these issues, it’s best to keep potatoes and basil separate in your garden.

9. Radishes

Radishes, though small, can be problematic when planted near basil.

Radishes can attract pests like flea beetles and root maggots, which could potentially spread to your basil plants.

Radishes also have different nutrient requirements, which can lead to competition between the plants, negatively impacting basil’s growth.

To ensure a healthy basil harvest, plant radishes away from your basil plants to avoid these potential issues.

10. Mint

Mint may seem like an ideal companion for basil due to its aromatic properties, but it can actually cause problems.

Mint is an aggressive grower and can easily take over a garden space, choking out your basil plants.

Mint also has a different water requirement, which can lead to overwatering or underwatering issues when planted close to basil.

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To protect your basil plants, it’s best to grow mint in containers or in a separate area of your garden.

11. Squash

Squash, while a popular garden vegetable, can be a poor companion for basil.

Squash plants have large leaves that can shade out your basil, inhibiting its growth and potentially causing weaker, less flavorful plants.

Additionally, squash can attract pests like squash bugs and cucumber beetles, which may spread to your basil plants.

To keep your basil thriving, it’s best to grow squash in a separate area of your garden.

12. Fennel

Fennel, though a fragrant and flavorful herb, can be a bad companion for basil.

Fennel has allelopathic properties, meaning it can release chemicals that inhibit the growth of other plants, including basil.

Additionally, fennel can attract pests like aphids that can damage your basil plants.

To maintain a healthy and productive basil harvest, it’s best to keep fennel and basil in separate parts of your garden.

Final Thoughts

While companion planting can provide many benefits to your garden, it’s essential to avoid certain plant pairings that can hinder growth or attract unwanted pests. By steering clear of these 12 bad companion plants for basil, you can help ensure a healthy and bountiful basil harvest. Happy gardening!