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13 Plants to Never Grow With Cucumbers

13 Plants to Never Grow With Cucumbers

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Cucumbers are a popular and refreshing garden vegetable that many of us love to grow. However, like all plants, cucumbers can be negatively affected by their surroundings.

As a gardening blogger, I’ve learned the importance of carefully choosing what to plant next to my cucumbers.

Some plants can stunt their growth or invite pests, while others may be beneficial.

In this article, I’ll share 13 plants that can hinder the growth of your cucumbers.

By knowing what not to plant next to your cucumbers, you can ensure a successful harvest and keep your cucumbers happy and healthy.

1. Sage

Sage is a beautiful and fragrant herb, but it’s not the best companion for cucumbers.

Sage prefers dry conditions, while cucumbers thrive in moist soil.

Planting them together can make it challenging to maintain the right moisture levels for both plants.

Additionally, sage can attract pests such as spider mites, which could spread to your cucumber plants and cause damage.

Instead, plant sage near other drought-tolerant plants, and give your cucumbers the moisture they need to grow. This way, you can avoid stressing both plants and minimize the risk of pest infestations.

2. Potatoes

Potatoes are a garden staple, but they’re not the best friends for cucumbers.

Both potatoes and cucumbers are susceptible to similar pests and diseases, such as blight and mosaic virus.

Planting them close together can increase the chances of these issues spreading.

Furthermore, since both plants require a significant amount of water and nutrients, there could be competition for resources.

To keep your cucumbers and potatoes healthy, grow them in separate areas of your garden. This will help prevent the spread of diseases and ensure both plants have access to the resources they need.

3. Garlic

Garlic is a flavorful and beneficial plant, but it’s not the best companion for cucumbers.

Garlic releases sulfur compounds that can be harmful to cucumber plants.

Planting garlic next to cucumbers can stunt their growth and lead to a less productive harvest.

The presence of garlic can cause cucumbers to become stunted or develop yellow leaves, ultimately reducing the overall yield.

Grow garlic away from cucumbers to ensure a bountiful crop. By doing so, you can avoid the negative effects of sulfur compounds on your cucumber plants.

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4. Fennel

Fennel is a delicious herb, but it’s not a good neighbor for cucumbers.

Fennel is allelopathic, meaning it releases chemicals that can inhibit the growth of other plants.

Cucumbers planted near fennel may struggle to grow and produce fruit.

The allelopathic nature of fennel can cause it to stunt the growth of nearby cucumber plants, reduce fruit production, and even cause the death of neighboring plants.

To avoid this issue, keep fennel and cucumbers separate in your garden. This will prevent the allelopathic effects of fennel from harming your cucumbers and help ensure a healthy harvest.

5. Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a popular and nutritious vegetable, but it’s not a great companion for cucumbers.

Both cauliflower and cucumbers require a lot of nutrients, which can lead to competition when planted together.

This competition for resources may lead to nutrient deficiencies in both plants, resulting in stunted growth and reduced yields.

Moreover, both plants have similar pest profiles, increasing the risk of infestations if planted close to each other.

Giving your cucumbers and cauliflower their own space will ensure both plants have access to the resources they need to thrive. This separation will also help minimize the risk of pests spreading between the plants.

6. Broccoli

Broccoli is a healthy and versatile vegetable, but it’s not the best friend for cucumbers.

Like cauliflower, broccoli and cucumbers can compete for nutrients when planted close together.

This competition may lead to reduced growth and smaller harvests for both plants.

Additionally, broccoli can attract pests such as cabbage worms and aphids, which could also infest your cucumber plants if grown too closely.

Separating these plants will give them the space and resources they need to produce an abundant harvest while minimizing the risk of pest infestations spreading between them.

7. Raspberries

Raspberries are a sweet and delightful fruit, but they’re not ideal companions for cucumbers.

Raspberries have extensive root systems that can compete with cucumbers for water and nutrients.

This competition for resources can lead to stunted growth and reduced yields for both plants.

In addition, raspberries can transmit viruses to cucumbers, such as mosaic virus, which can severely damage your cucumber plants.

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To keep your cucumbers healthy, plant raspberries at a distance. By doing so, you can prevent the spread of diseases and ensure that both plants have access to the necessary resources.

8. Strawberries

Strawberries are a delicious treat, but they’re not the best companions for cucumbers.

Both strawberries and cucumbers are susceptible to the same diseases, such as verticillium wilt and powdery mildew.

Planting them together increases the risk of these diseases spreading.

Moreover, strawberries have shallow root systems that can compete with cucumbers for water and nutrients, potentially stunting growth and reducing yields.

To keep your cucumbers and strawberries healthy, plant them separately. This will help prevent the spread of diseases and ensure that both plants have the necessary resources to thrive.

9. Cabbage

Cabbage is a versatile vegetable, but it’s not a good companion for cucumbers.

Both cabbage and cucumbers are heavy feeders, meaning they require a lot of nutrients from the soil.

When planted together, they can compete for these essential resources, leading to reduced growth and smaller harvests.

Additionally, cabbage can attract pests like cabbage worms and aphids, which could also infest and damage your cucumber plants if grown too closely.

Planting them apart will allow both plants to get the nutrients they need to grow and produce a bountiful harvest while minimizing the risk of pest infestations.

10. Asparagus

Asparagus is a delicious and tender vegetable, but it’s not the best neighbor for cucumbers.

Asparagus and cucumbers have different pH preferences, with asparagus preferring a more alkaline soil and cucumbers thriving in a slightly acidic environment.

Growing them together can make it difficult to maintain the ideal soil conditions for both plants, potentially causing nutrient imbalances and reduced growth.

Moreover, asparagus can attract pests like asparagus beetles, which may also harm your cucumber plants if grown too closely.

Separate your asparagus and cucumbers for the best results. This will help maintain the ideal soil conditions for each plant and reduce the risk of pest infestations.

11. Onions

Onions are a kitchen staple, but they’re not great companions for cucumbers.

Onions can attract pests such as thrips, which can harm your cucumbers.

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These tiny insects can cause significant damage to cucumber plants, reducing their overall health and productivity.

Furthermore, onions have a strong smell that can deter pollinators, which are essential for cucumber fruit production.

Planting onions in a separate area of your garden will help to prevent these issues and ensure that both plants can thrive without hindering one another’s growth.

12. Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are a nutritious and tasty vegetable, but they’re not the best friends for cucumbers.

Like cabbage and broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cucumbers can compete for nutrients when planted together.

This competition for resources can lead to reduced growth and smaller harvests for both plants.

Additionally, Brussels sprouts can attract pests such as cabbage worms and aphids, which could also infest your cucumber plants if grown too closely.

To keep your cucumbers and Brussels sprouts healthy, grow them in separate areas of your garden. This will help to ensure both plants have the resources they need to thrive and minimize the risk of pest infestations spreading between them.

13. Melons

Melons are a refreshing and juicy fruit, but they’re not ideal companions for cucumbers.

Both melons and cucumbers have similar growing requirements and can compete for water, nutrients, and space.

This competition can lead to stunted growth and reduced yields for both plants, making it difficult for them to reach their full potential.

In addition, melons can attract pests such as cucumber beetles and squash bugs, which can also harm your cucumber plants if grown too closely.

Planting melons and cucumbers apart will help prevent competition and ensure that both plants have room to grow and produce a bountiful harvest while minimizing the risk of pest infestations.

Final Thoughts

When it comes to gardening, it’s crucial to consider the relationships between different plants.

The right companion planting can lead to a thriving and productive garden, while the wrong pairings can hinder growth and invite pests.

By avoiding these 13 plants when planting your cucumbers, you can ensure a successful harvest and keep your cucumbers healthy and happy.

Remember, successful gardening is all about understanding and respecting the needs and preferences of your plants.

Happy gardening!