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12 Bad Companion Plants for Garlic You Should Avoid

12 Bad Companion Plants for Garlic You Should Avoid

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Garlic is an incredible addition to any home garden, but it’s crucial to ensure that the plants around it are compatible companions.

In this article, we’ll discuss 12 plants that are not ideal for your garlic garden.

By avoiding these plants, you can keep your garlic healthy and thriving.

So let’s dive in and find out which plants to stay clear of!

1. Beans

Beans and garlic make a bad pair in the garden.

Garlic can inhibit the growth of beans, as both plants compete for nutrients and water.

In addition, beans have a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and garlic’s natural antifungal properties can hinder this process.

Avoid planting these two together for a more harmonious garden.

Furthermore, beans and garlic have different growth patterns, making it difficult for them to coexist harmoniously in a garden bed.

To give both plants their best chance at success, it’s better to keep them separate.

2. Peas

Like beans, peas are not a great match for garlic.

Garlic’s strong smell can inhibit the growth of peas, and both plants have competing nutrient needs.

Moreover, garlic can interfere with the nitrogen-fixing bacteria essential to pea growth.

Keep your peas and garlic separate for a happier, more productive garden.

In addition, peas and garlic have different growing seasons, which can cause issues if they’re planted together.

By planting them apart, you can optimize the growth of both plants.

3. Asparagus

Asparagus and garlic should not be planted together, as garlic can stunt asparagus growth.

Both plants have strong and deep root systems, causing competition for nutrients and water in the soil.

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By planting them apart, you’ll ensure that both asparagus and garlic have the resources they need to thrive.

Furthermore, asparagus is a perennial plant, while garlic is an annual, so their differing life cycles can make it challenging to maintain a balanced garden.

4. Potatoes

Potatoes and garlic are not the best companions in the garden.

Garlic can inhibit the growth of potatoes, as both plants compete for water and nutrients.

Additionally, garlic and potatoes are susceptible to similar pests and diseases, which could potentially spread between the plants.

For a healthier garden, it’s best to plant them separately.

Moreover, rotating potato crops with garlic can help reduce soil-borne diseases, further emphasizing the need to keep them apart.

5. Onions

Although onions and garlic belong to the same family, they should not be grown together.

Both plants attract the same pests, such as onion flies, thrips, and nematodes, increasing the risk of infestations.

Growing them apart reduces the chance of pest problems and helps maintain a healthier garden.

Moreover, planting onions and garlic together can lead to competition for nutrients and space, potentially reducing the growth and yield of both plants.

6. Sunflowers

Sunflowers and garlic make poor companions in the garden.

Sunflowers have an allelopathic effect, which means they release chemicals that inhibit the growth of nearby plants, including garlic.

Additionally, sunflowers are heavy feeders, competing with garlic for water and nutrients.

Keep these two plants separate to avoid growth issues.

Plus, sunflowers can create excessive shade for garlic, making it difficult for the latter to receive adequate sunlight.

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7. Broccoli

Broccoli and garlic should not be planted together.

Both plants are heavy feeders and compete for the same nutrients in the soil.

This competition can lead to stunted growth and reduced yields for both plants.

To ensure a bountiful harvest, it’s best to grow broccoli and garlic in separate garden beds.

Additionally, broccoli and garlic share similar pests, such as aphids and whiteflies, which can spread more easily if the plants are grown together.

By keeping them apart, you can better control pest populations and maintain a healthier garden.

8. Cauliflower

Cauliflower, like broccoli, is not a good companion for garlic.

Both plants are heavy feeders, competing for nutrients and water in the soil.

Planting them together can result in stunted growth and lower yields.

Moreover, cauliflower and garlic attract similar pests, increasing the likelihood of infestations.

To keep your garden healthy, it’s best to plant cauliflower and garlic separately.

9. Brussel Sprouts

Brussel sprouts and garlic should be grown apart for several reasons.

Both plants compete for nutrients, which can lead to slower growth and reduced yields.

Additionally, they share common pests, such as aphids and cabbage worms, which can easily spread between plants.

By planting Brussel sprouts and garlic separately, you can minimize pest problems and ensure that both plants have access to the nutrients they need.

10. Kale

Kale and garlic do not make good companions in the garden.

Both plants are heavy feeders and have similar nutrient needs, which can result in competition and hinder growth.

Furthermore, they share common pests, like aphids and cabbage worms, which can spread more easily if the plants are grown together.

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To maintain a healthy and productive garden, it’s best to grow kale and garlic in separate beds.

11. Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is another brassica plant that doesn’t pair well with garlic.

They both have high nutrient requirements, and growing them together can lead to competition for resources.

In addition, kohlrabi and garlic share similar pests, such as aphids and cabbage worms, which can spread more easily between plants if they’re grown in close proximity.

For the best results, plant kohlrabi and garlic in separate garden areas.

12. Turnips

Turnips, like other brassica plants, are not suitable companions for garlic.

Both plants are heavy feeders, competing for water and nutrients in the soil.

This competition can lead to reduced growth and lower yields for both turnips and garlic.

Additionally, turnips and garlic are susceptible to similar pests, increasing the risk of infestations.

By planting them separately, you can ensure a healthier and more productive garden.

Final Thoughts

Growing garlic can be a rewarding experience, but it’s essential to be mindful of the plants you choose as companions.

Avoiding these 12 bad companion plants for garlic will help you maintain a healthy, thriving garden and ensure your garlic plants reach their full potential.

With careful planning and proper plant selection, your garlic garden will be the envy of fellow gardeners.

Happy gardening!